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ISSN 2229-5356
Impact Factor 2012 = 0.47
Indian Journal of Health & Wellbeing
copyright 2011 IAHRW . All Rights Reserved
Volume - 7 (2016), Issue - 12
Editor - Sunil Saini, PhD
About this Journal

Development and validation of a psychometric scale for assessing work group climate
Page 1113-1118
Amish, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University, Lucknow, UP, and A. P. Singh Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Science, Banaras HIndu UNiversity, Varanasi

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This paper presents the development and validation process of a new scale for assessing work group climate in organizational setting. Every organization and every workgroup has a climate. Climate is the environment in which people work that affects how people behave at work. Workgroups with a positive, supportive climate tend to perform well and achieve their desired results. To assess the work group climate a scale was developed which consists of 21 items before standardization. In this scale participants have to give responses based on self-perception about climate of their group. Sample of 215 employees working in different private sector organizations were selected for the standardization of this scale. The reliability index was ascertained by computing Cronbach's alpha coefficient which was found to be 0.867 for this scale. Based on corrected item-total correlation, 5 items were excluded. Results of factor analysis (Principal Component Analysis with Varimax Rotation) indicate that three component solutions were formed suitable to the scale. 1 item was excluded due to cross loadings and 15 remaining items are retained from the original scale. This scale has good reliability index and satisfactory construct validity. It could be a useful tool for work group climate in organizational setting.
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Adjustment and self-esteem of young adults from both-working parents and single-working parent families: A comparative study
Page 1119-1123
Ion Sharma, Amity Institute of Behavioural Health and Applied Sciences, Amity University, Uttar Pradesh and Seema Singh Department of Psychology Amity University, Uttar Pradesh

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The aim of the present study is to compare the “Adjustment and Self esteem of young adults belonging to both-working parents and single-working parent families”. In the study, sample consisted of 50 total young adults (18-22yrs), 25 each belonging to the two groups. Here, t-test for independent sample was used to see the difference between the two groups on adjustment and its different dimensions and self esteem. Correlation between adjustments, its different dimensions and self esteem were also obtained. The results indicate that total adjustment of children of single-working parent families is higher and also showed high adjustment on health and social areas. Self esteem is found higher in young adults from both working parent families but without much difference. Significant correlation is found between self-esteem and total adjustment, and all the dimensions of adjustment except for social adjustment area.
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Study of career maturity in urban and rural adolescents
Page 1124-1126
Vibha Rani Sahu, Department of Psychology, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur, C.G. and Ushakiran Agarwal Govt. D.B.Girls P.G. College Raipur, Chhatisgarh

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The present study was designed to examine the role of locale in career maturity of adolescent. The sample of the present study included 200 urban subjects in which 100 male and 100 female, both are students of X class, and 200 rural students in which 100 male and 100 female of X class are included. Subjects were administered Career maturity Inventory developed by Gupta. MANOVA was used for the data analysis. Results revealed that locale affect the career maturity of adolescent; it produces significant difference in career maturity. Results of this study revealed that urban students showed higher mean scores on total scores of career maturity in comparison to rural subjects.
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Management of psychological distress and counselling interventions: A qualitative analysis
Page 1127-1130
Sonakshi Ruhela, Department of Psychology Amity University, Dubai and Abha Singh Amity Institute of Psychology and Allied Sciences, Amity University, Noida

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Mirowsk, Ross (2002) explained Psychological distress as a state of emotional suffering that is termed by symptoms of depression such as loss of interest; sadness; anxiety, restlessness or general feelings of tense. Counseling interventions, on the other hand, are more preventive in approach and curative in their nature. These interventions focus on the management of normal day to day mental concerns of people and are focused on strength based healing and active solution focused approach. The objective of the study is to understand the relation between Management of Psychological distress and counseling interventions in sample of 15 individuals between the ages of 25 to 45 years. Sample criterion specifies population that has been cured for psychological distress through counseling interventions and has taken minimum of 5 counseling sessions each. A focus group interview and thematic analysis were the qualitative measures taken for the study. As predicted, Counseling interventions were associated with lower levels of distress and better overall mental health and coping.
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Personality and social adjustment among transgender
Page 1131-1134
Jharna Ganguly and Kamayani Mathur Department of Psychology, School of Psychology, Philosophy & Education, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

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Transgender are stigmatized in many parts of the world but has become more widely known in Western culture in the mid to late 20th century, concurrently with the sexual revolution and the development of sexual reassignment surgeries. The aim of present research was to study and compare personality and its various dimension (neuroticism-emotional stability, extraversion-introversion) as well as social adjustment. A total sample of 30 trans gender was selected by stratified sampling method as representative sample and was further divided as per age group (25 to 35 and age 35 to 47 years) and area of habitat (urban; rural). Maudsley Personality Inventory (MPI) (Jalota & Kapoor, 1975) and Social Adjustment Inventory (SAI-D) (Deva, 2005) were selected as tools. The collected data was analysed using statistical software package and students 't' test was calculated. The findings showed a significant difference between the dimensions of Neuroticism-Emotional stability, Extraversion/ Introversion and the age group and area of habitat of transgender. The calculated results of Social Adjustment Inventory indicated a significant difference between the area of habitat and the emotional adjustment of transgender. It can be inferred that due to the discrimination they face since school that they never have enough confidence to continue studying and become eligible for all the white collar jobs. The main problems that are being faced by the transgender community are of discrimination, unemployment, lack of educational facilities, homelessness, lack of medical facilities like HIV care and hygiene, depression, hormone pill abuse, tobacco and alcohol abuse, penectomy and problems related to marriage and adoption.
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Nomophobia: The problem lies at our fingertips
Page 1135-1139
Saroj Sharma Nagpal, Post Graduate Govt College Sector 11, Chandigarh and Ramanpreet Kaur Department of Psychology Panjab University, Chandigarh

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This study is an attempt to understand the modern age mobile phone addiction- nomophobia and its relationship with impulsiveness in youngsters. Nomophobia is on the rise in the population on account of technology dependence and penetration of mobile phones in the society. The literal meaning of nomophobia is the no-mobile-phone phobia. It is an anxiety experienced by an individual when he/she is not having access to their mobile phone. Impulsiveness is lack of impulse control and inability to delay gratification. This paper also examines gender differences in nomophobia and impulsiveness. For this purpose, sample was drawn from college students. The sample comprised two hundred bachelors and masters degrees students (N=200) i.e. one hundred males and one hundred females from the age range of 18-23 years. The questionnaire was administered to them after procuring informed consent. The techniques of Pearson Product Moment Correlation and student's t-test were employed for the analysis of data.
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A study of caregiver burden, general health and stress resiliency among the mothers of children with intellectual disability
Page 1140-1143
Hardeep Kaur, Department of Social Work, Punjabi University, Patiala

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Intellectual disability is characterized by significant limitations both in intellectual functioning and in the adaptive behavior. Caregivers of children with intellectual disability often undergo a lot of stress and health issues. Since mothers are the primary caregivers of the children, they are often weighed down by various issues. Adequate support can create resiliency in them. The paper outlines the level of care giver burden, general health and stress resiliency of the mothers of children with intellectual disability. A total 27 mothers of children with intellectual disability were taken up as a sample for this study. Caregiver Burden Scale, General Health Questionnaire and Stress Resiliency Profile were used to assess the caregiver burden, health issues and stress resiliency among the mothers of children with intellectual disability. The data was analyzed using frequency method .The results on care giving burden among the mothers of children with intellectual disability indicated that more than half (59.26%) of the mothers reported mild to moderate burden , around 29.63 % showed symptoms of moderate to severe burden and very few (11.11%) reported of little or no burden . The scores of general health of the mothers showed that majority ( 88.89%)of mothers reported social dysfunction and half (59.26%) of them showed symptoms of anxiety/insomnia and around 29.63% stated to have somatic symptoms .The results on stress resiliency profile showed that the percentage of mothers who were in the stress resilient category included 33.33% deficiency focusing , 22.22 % necessitating , 44.44% skill recognition..Similarly the ones who were close to average use of each habit were 44.44 % who reported of deficiency focusing, 37.04 % necessitating and 37.04 % of skill recognition .The mothers who were in the stress predisposing category included 33.33 % were the ones who reported of using deficiency focusing , 29.63 % necessitating and 18.52 % of skill
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Early intervention and diagnosis of autism
Page 1144-1148
Vijaya Jagan and Anuradha Sathiyaseelan Department of Psychology, Christ University, Bangalore, Karnatak

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Individuals with autism have a pronounced struggle in social interaction, social communication and may display repetitive and restricted interests and behaviour. The etiology of autism, however, remains largely unknown. These behaviours can be challenging for the parents and the people in the environments the individuals move around. Early diagnosis and intervention have proven to be beneficial to curb or manage the challenging behaviours in children with autism. Interventions such as sensory integration, occupational therapy, speech therapy, special education, behaviour modification strategies all help to bridge the gap that the child may have as compared to their peers and contributes to normalizing their development. Successful intervention follows a timely diagnosis and for this to happen, symptoms must be recognized by the parents as early as possible and also be diagnosed by a health professional. There are several factors which lead to a delay in diagnosis of autism and the consequence being a deprivation of timely and appropriate intervention for the child. Some of them include lack of genetic markers, the co-occurrences of autism with other disabilities, improvement or changes in behaviours as the child grows, limited diagnostic tools, poor understanding and lack of knowledge among professionals and feelings of stigma in parents and family. Timely diagnosis and intervention are desirable as it plays a pivotal role in helping children with autism improve their communication skills; reduce meltdowns and opens up avenues for better parental compliance. Parents have to be educated about the early warning signs through awareness campaigns, and professionals have to improve their knowledge of autism as it is their diagnosis that sets the tone for intervention.
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Selfie and mental health issues: An overview
Page 1149-1152
Satinder Kaur and Deepika Vig Department of Human Development and Family Studies, College of Home Science, PAU, Ludhiana

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A selfie is a self-portrait photograph of oneself, taken with camera or a camera phone held at arm's length or pointed at a mirror that is usually shared through social media. Though people were fond of taking photographs of their own and others since many decades, with selfie camera it has lead to an extreme effect. Selfies became a very interesting topic for researchers to study and examine the cause since 2012, as the rate of usage of selfie has reportedly increased many fold. The extent of selfie addiction can be well judged from the fact that many deaths have been reported in India due to increasing obsession of taking selfies in general public. Infact, India has witnessed highest number of selfie deaths in recent years. A strong relationship has been found between selfie addiction and various mental health issues like poor self esteem, narcissism, loneliness and depression. Addiction with selfie in youth, especially teenagers and mental health issues are on the rise as many psychiatrists are seeing number of parents coming with the same complaint. Therefore, it is right time to sensitize parents, teachers and educators about the alarming increase in selfie addiction and its deteriorating impact on mental health of adolescents.
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Dramatics in alleviation of mild-moderate childhood depression: A review of past decades
Page 1153-1155
Silky Arora and Roopali Sharma AIPS, Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh

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Childhood depression can range from simple sadness to severe form of the disorder. Psycho therapies are implied to alleviate symptoms of depression, most Commonly, Cognitive Behavior Therapy . Along with these therapies, techniques of arts such as music, dramatics and theater, drawing , play, are incorporated as Integrated eclectic approach . Studies have shown that only the above techniques can slow the progression and considerably alleviate the symptoms of Depressive disorder, anger-aggression, anxiety in children, adolescents and youth. Review Literature of past decades was thoroughly studied and the application of psycho therapies with the inclusion of dramatics and theater techniques was segregated. These techniques have proven beneficial in reducing the post assessment scores, after the intervention therapies, in Post traumatic stress disorder(sexually abused)in adolescent girls, depressive disorder, social phobia. Thus, there is a vast scope in exploring dramatics techniques such as, Role play, Facial expressiveness, Improvisation, Story telling ,Group plays in mild depressive disorders in children and adolescents.
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Hope: A tool for managing adversities at workplace
Page 1156-1159
Garima Yadav and Sandeep Kumar, Department of Psychology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh

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The global economy, demanding organizations, uncertainties, rising unemployment, anxieties about future job loss, lack of access to affordable health care, a crisis in the financial industry, and declining consumer confidence has created a significant stress in the life of the workers and their families. The adversities research in the field of positive organizational behavior is rising rapidly. The present paper reviews the shift of organizations from traditional HRM practices, to enhancing the psychological capital of the workers. In the recent times the value of positive psychological resources has gained focus for theory building, research, and application in psychology. The paper reviews the significance of hope as a positive psychological resource, it's relevance at workplace, it's relatedness to employee's health and performance, and the conditions, interventions that could be applied to enhance hope.
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Alcoholism in girls: A theoretical framework
Page 1160-1162
Sangeeta Trama and Omna Department of Psychology, Punjabi University, Patiala

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Drinking by college-aged students remains a major issue. Results of recent research that have demonstrated that brain development continues well into early adulthood and that alcohol consumption can interfere with such development (Room, Babor, & Rehm 2005; Murray & Lopez 1997) indicate that alcohol use by youth is an even greater pediatric health concern. Studies done in the late 1970s and early 1980s found that 12.7% of high school students, 32.6% of university students, and 31.6% of young non-students consumed alcohol. In India, with special reference to Punjab, girls are into alcoholism. Going to clubs, discs etc. have become a trend among young girls. Drinking and partying provides a false sense of liberation and empowerment. In addition, research shows that having male friends increases the risk of alcohol use; spending time with boys makes girls feel more comfortable with sensation seeking and contributes to more adult-like precocious behavior. Girls find that alcohol has a disinhibiting effect that enhances their perception of being more confident, increases social comfort, and offers feelings of being sexually alluring. Moreover, for many college age girls, living on campus is often their first time away from home without constant supervision. Many girls take on drinking because they are separated from previous support systems and have new peers they are trying to impress. Young adult girls are facing forceful drinking due to their relationship partner demands to be like this. Thus present paper reflects upon the issue of alcoholism in girls and the factors that may lead to alcoholism.
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Quality of life of farm labour in BPL village
Page 1163-1166
Sonu Bharti and Pallavi Bhatnagar Department of Psychology, University of Lucknow, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

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Quality of life is defined as ''individual's perception of their positions in life in the context of the culture and values system in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standard and concern. It is a board ranging concept affected in a complex way by person's physical health, psychological state, and level of independence, social relationships, personal belief and their relationship to salient features of their environment”. There are many villages in India whose residents face various problems such as social exclusion, poverty, unemployment, denial of basic amenities such as education, primary health care. Their average situations negatively affect the person's perception of their quality of life. The present study explores the quality of life of different age group of male and female farm labours of village Levruwa, Jaunpur district Uttar Pradesh. Further the t- test has also been calculated to find out the gender difference. The major finding reveals that females have found higher scores dimensions of quality of life marginalized work, on all three personal and socio-economic dimensions in comparisons to their male counterparts.
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Role of emotional intelligence in career maturity of adolescence
Page 1167-1169
Vibha Rani Sahu and Neha Singh Thakur Department of Psychology, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur, C.G.

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The present study was designed to examine the role of emotional intelligence in career maturity of adolescent. The sample of the present study included 100 subjects (50 male & 50 female) students of X class are included. Subjects were administered Career maturity Inventory developed by Gupta (1971) and Hindi version of emotional intelligence scale by Mishra (2000). One way MANOVA was used for the data analysis. Results revealed that emotional intelligence significantly affects the career maturity of adolescent.
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Yoga and spirituality
Page 1170-1172
Shamsul Siddiqui Department of Psychology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh

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Yoga is a spiritual and ascetic discipline, a part of which, including breath control, simple meditation, and the adoption of specific bodily postures, is widely practiced for health and relaxation. The word “yoga” comes from the Sanskrit root yuj which means to join. Yoga is a practical aid, not a religion. Yoga is an ancient art based on a harmonizing system of development for the body, mind, and spirit. The continued practice of yoga will lead you to a sense of peace and well-being, and also a feeling of being at one with their environment. Yoga is a holistic package for happy living. It provides techniques to unite the body, mind and breath, and connect to the inner core of our being the spiritual aspect of our lives. Spirituality gives inner strength; Spirituality gives inner strength to manage difficult situations and to keep smiling. Being established in the Self, your inner peace spreads outward, and makes you a more responsible human being full of caring, sharing and love. In sleep you get rid of fatigue, but the deeper stresses remain in your body. Meditation, Yoga, and Sudarshan Kriya cleanse even the deepest layers of your consciousness, leaving you rested and refreshed.
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School bulling in relation to peer relation and self-efficacy
Page 1173-1175
Taruna, Department of Psychology Singhania University, Rajasthan and V.N. Yadav Department of Psychology Govt. PG College, Bhiwani, Haryana

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The present study examined the relation in school bulling, peer pressure and self-efficacy. The study was comprised of 400 students (200 boys & 200 girls) from district Bhiwani of Haryana School bullying questionnaire by Olweus (1996), Peer Relation Questionnaire by Rigby and Slee (1993) and General Self-efficacy Scale used to assess the study under variables. Pearson's Product Moment Correlation method was used to analyze the results. The findings indicated that significant relation in school bullying, peer pressure and self-efficacy among boys and girls.
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Effect of cognitive remediation training on quality of life and self-esteem among patients with bipolar disorder in remission: A preliminary study
Page 1176-1178
Geo. A. Joseph, Central Institute of Psychiatry, Ranchi, Jharkhand, C.R.J. Khess Department of Psychiatry Central Institute of Psychiatry Kanke, Ranchi, Jharkhand, and Amool Ranjan Singh Department of Clinical Psychology Ranchi Institute of Neuropsychiatry and Allied Sciences, Kanke, Ranchi, Jharkhand

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Bipolar affective disorder is a devastating mental illness with alternating episodes of mania, depression and mixed mood states with some inter episodic recovery phase in between. Age of onset of this illness can be at any age from childhood to old age. Usually people get affected by this serious illness during their adolescence, hence this affect their study, career and marriage prospects. Damage caused by this illness is not just limited to social, occupational, familial and financial aspects. Fundamental cognitive functions like attention, memory and executive function required for a life time will get badly affected due to the psychotic nature of the illness and long term use of psychiatric medicines. At present in our country, treatment of bipolar affective disorder is grossly centered on pharmacological management with mood stabilizers and antipsychotics. This study is an elementary effort to incorporate cognitive rededication training in the current treatment regime of bipolar affective disorder in order to enhance cognitive functions and thereby improve quality of life and self-esteem of patients with bipolar disorder in remission.
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Globalization: Challenge and issues for Indian working women
Page 1179-1184
Archana Upadhyay and A. P. Singh Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi and Abha Singh Department of Psychology Jagatpur PG College, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh

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Globalization is an emerging trend in modern society. It has greatly affected every sphere of life all around the world. The present study concentrated to analyze the socio-economic effects of globalization on the working women in India. Its current wave has widely improved the lives of women worldwide, particularly the lives of those women working in the developing countries. But in spite of that women remain disadvantaged in many areas of life, including education, employment, health, and civil rights. Mostly women are working as unskilled labour. The major objective of this review paper is to find out the true impact of globalization on women's socio-economic position and their participation in different economic activities.
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Role of behavioural techniques in patients with insomnia and headache
Page 1185-1189
Dinesh Naik N.V.P. Mondal's Arts, Commerce & Science College, Lasalgaon, Nasik, Maharastra

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Behavioral treatments focus exclusively on modifying environmental contexts/contingencies and patterns of behavior that presumably exacerbate symptoms and functional impairment. Cognitive-behavioral treatments (CBTs), by comparison, include a focus on behavior modification and an emphasis on modifying maladaptive patterns of thinking. There are central elements of CBT and self-management which cut across treatment for specific psychiatric disorders and headache disorders. In many cases, insomnia and headache occurs when there is another problem, such as stress, pain, or a medical condition. In these cases, treatment of the underlying problem may help to improve sleep. In other cases, the causative factor of insomnia is unclear or the insomnia does not improve even after the treatment of the co-existing problem. Hence, the insomnia itself requires to be particularly treated.
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